It’s not unusual for doctors to fail to diagnose certain illnesses. However, after plenty of check ups and tests, they manage to detect what is wrong with their patients. Sadly, one mother from Indiana named Kathi Wilson spent 10 long years going from one doctor to another, but no one could tell her what was wrong as her health was getting worse and worse with each passing day.

X-rays, all sorts of screenings, MRIs, you name it, Kathi went through all of that. Her doctor, Mary Beth Hensley, simply couldn’t pinpoint what made Kathi sick. She was experiencing fatigues, muscle aches, and much more. During the last few years, she had troubles walking and was forced to use a cane.

The mysterious illness Kathi was suffering from was finally detected by a group of construction workers. They didn’t need any stethoscopes or any medical equipment to solve this poor woman’s problem. What they used instead were their wrenches.

Decide

Namely, these contractors were hired to remodel Kathi’s bathroom. As they started working, they noticed that the furnace and the water heater were improperly hooked up which led to small amounts of carbon monoxide to leak. This colorless and odorless gas known as the “silent killer” was poisoning Kathi.

Source: YouTube/ Inside Edition

She was lucky she hired these workers whom she now considers her heroes.

After they did their job, Kathi started feeling better right away. She regained her energy and strength and is no longer using her cane.

Speaking to Inside Edition, she said, “I felt great. Mentally, I haven’t been this happy in I couldn’t tell you how long.”

The video of Kathi’s story has been seen by thousands of people. One viewer wrote, “That is terrible when no one knows what’s wrong with you. Going to doctor after doctor with no relief. I am happy she is doing much better and has her life back.”

You can take a look at the entire story below. Make sure you check your cars, furnaces, heaters, generators, and the like which produce carbon monoxide.

Kathi is happy to be alive.

MEDIA